Summer is still hanging on! The deals are “hot” so come by Sunday, September 15 for some “cool” music finds!

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It was SO great to see everyone at our show In August after our summer break! The place was packed! Don’t forget to join us September 15th from 9am-3pm at the air-conditioned Arbutus Volunteer Fire Department Hall. You can come earlier while the dealers are setting up and perhaps score a big deal before the crowd pours in. Admission is always FREE and the lovely ladies in the kitchen serve up tasty and very reasonably priced food for breakfast and lunch.

As we posted on our Facebook page, a recent article in Rolling Stone told us what we have known for some time – vinyl is making a BIG resurgence! It’s so incredible that “Vinyl Is Poised to Outsell CDs For the First Time Since 1986.” We love all of our music, no matter the format, but there is nothing like that rich, deep sound of vinyl – imperfections and all. You can go to our Facebook page for the link to the full article.

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It was so good to see familiar faces and we are also noticing that more ladies and families are coming to our shows which is amazing. And let’s not forget, August marked  the 50th Anniversary of WOODSTOCK. Our own Merriweather Post Pavilion ALMOST became the site of the celebration. Some things you just can’t recreate. And we never forget the anniversary of the passing in August of a giant, Elvis Presley.

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We found lots of goodies along with some favorite regular vendors and buyers.

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Vendor Bill Cox and his “Crabby” hat!

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 Mega collector John was so excited about the new bag he got from Derek, our wonderful announcer! And John loves our website!

The ladies of all ages are representing!

More goodies below!

 

We are back from summer break and ready to rock! Join us Sunday, August 18th!

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We hope you are having a great summer and took advantage of the July break with some fun in the sun – beach, barbecues and baseball! The Arbutus Record Show is back and ready to rock with the return of our fabulous vendors and stacks of great, new items. Join us Sunday, August 18 for great deals on all your favorite music items. The show is open from 9 am – 3 pm and is always FREE! The fire hall is air-conditioned and our food ladies will be there with great breakfast and lunch options as well.

When you think of summer, you can’t help but think of the beach and surfing. This year, we lost a music icon in Dick Dale (born Richard Monsour), known as “The King of Surf Guitar.” He learned to play many musical instruments as a child and then picked up the guitar. Dale learned to surf after his family moved to California when he was a senior in high school. His performances at the Rendezvous Ballroom in Balboa, California in 1961 spawned the surf music phenomenon. Dale’s unique sound was influenced by his heritage as a Lebanese- American his interest in Arabic music.

The British Invasion, lead by The Beatles in 1964, was a huge hit to surf rock – as well other music genres at the time – and its national success was short-lived. However, Dale’s career had a rebirth in the 80s when he was nominated in 1987 for “Pipeline” with Stevie Ray Vaughn from the Back to the Beach – a film in which he also appeared. When Quentin Tarantino used Dale’s signature “Misirlou” in his movie classic Pulp Fiction in 1994, Dale’s music reached a whole new audience and rebooted his career again.

Dale was inducted into the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville in 2009 and  the Surfing Walk of Fame in Huntington Beach, California in 2011. Due to a multitude of serious health issues, Dale had to tour to pay the bills and was booked through November of this year. Sadly he succumbed to his illnesses on March 16.

Dale was not only a pioneer in developing his own unique music form and a killer guitar player, utilizing reverb, he also contributed to the development of music equipment. He worked with Fender to create the first 85-watt transformer and then they teamed with the Triad Company to produce a 100-watt version, known as the Dual Showman. He also is considered by some to be the father of heavy metal, influencing such artists as Eddie Van Halen.

When you think summer, you think beach and you can’t help but think of Dick Dale’s unique sound!

It’s Father’s Day this Sunday, June 16 at the Arbutus Record Show!

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Spend part of your Father’s Day with us this Sunday, June 16 at the Arbutus Fire Hall from 9 am – 3 pm. Admission is always FREE! We have the ladies serving great breakfast and lunch options as always. It’s a perfect time to show your dad some music love with fabulous gifts!

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May’s show was hopping and made even more special by the appearance of one of our favorite people and former vendor, Al Ercolani, Jr!  He came with his lovely daughter, Jill, and everyone was so thrilled to see him! We are hoping maybe he might consider coming back once and awhile. He is so knowledgeable and kind and we wish him well.

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Janet was at the mic making a special announcement during the show. She and her wonderful husband (and dad), Frank, always do a great job!

There were tons of booths with beautiful displays of a wide variety of music deals last month. All our great vendors will be back this Sunday to help you find something special to celebrate dad. See you there!

Don’t forget! There is no show in July, so enjoy your summer! We will see you back August 18!

 

It’s Memorial Day Weekend! Visit us on Sunday, May 26 and start your summer with great music!

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Hard to believe summer is finally HERE! Don’t forget to make some time in between family celebrations and honoring our military heroes and visit us this Sunday, May 26 for some great summer music finds! Come to our home at the Arbutus Fire Hall from 9am – 3pm and remember, it’s always FREE!

We will have the full complement of our great dealers who promise to bring loads of fabulous music items. The gals in the kitchen will be cooking up some great food for breakfast and lunch.

April’s show was another success and we found some really interesting items including some rare Beatles items, Star Trek Book and Record sets, a guitar, and so much more!

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

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Spring has sprung! Join us for a special FOURTH Sunday show, April 28th!

 

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We hope you had a great Passover/Easter celebration  – which is why we are having a special fourth Sunday show on April 28! We had fun time at the Arbutus Fire Hall last month on St. Patty’s Day! Janet and vendors were all decked out in their green and we saw lots of green among the record show treasures. There was a gentleman with an awesome pin collection on a very cool, leather jacket. Another great tribute to Skip Groff from Washington’s City Paper was there for all to read. It was also wonderful to see Skip’s wife and sister manning his booth. Skip will be sorely missed.

So come on down 9am- 3pm on Sunday to hunt for music treasures and have some great food from the ladies in the kitchen!

Celebrate St. Patty’s Day with us! Put on (and bring) your “green” this Sunday, March 17th!

Spring is just around the corner and this year, St. Patrick’s Day falls on the same day as our Sunday show! Put on your green (and don’t forget to bring your green) and maybe you will find that elusive pot of music gold! Come by this Sunday, March 17 at the Arbutus Fire Hall from 9 am – 3 pm. Admission is always FREE! We hope the lovely ladies might serve some Irish treats like last year but the food is always good with great breakfast and lunch options.

There was a packed show in February. Janet was lovely in red, celebrating Valentine’s Day. We look forward to seeing her decked out in green!

We also had some special guests from upstate New York in February. They both love the show and try to make it at least once a year since it is quite a trip for them. Perhaps that is why the hall was jumping! Jack Skutnik and Tom Konopka hail from Binghamton and Rochester respectively. Like all collectors, they started very young. Jack began collecting at five years old when he bought the “Teddy Bear’s Picnic.” He loves the Arbutus Record Show and has come down for the past 10 years with tons of great music. Jack started doing shows in the 80s and is now up to around 18 a year – including producing five shows of his own.

Jack Skutnik participated in our show in February. He hails from Binghamton, New York.

Jack Skutnik participated in our show in February. He hails from Binghamton, New York.

Tom drove seven hours down from Rochester and had a huge display of great music at his booth. He started collecting when he was a teenager. After a few years of being “Mr. Mom” to his daughter, he started doing shows. About half of his own collection is jazz and the rest crosses all genres. We wish they were closer but love having both of these friendly and knowledgeable vendors visit our show at least once a year!

Tom Konopka from Rochester, NY shows off his booth of extensive music offerings.

Tom Konopka from Rochester, NY shows off his booth of extensive music offerings.

The Arbutus Record Show family mourns the unexpected loss of Skip Groff

The entire Arbutus Record Show family was saddened by the unexpected loss of of Skip Groff in February. We send our heartfelt condolences to his family. He will be missed by all of the record collecting community.

Skip’s memorial will be held at the Robert J. Parilla Center for the Performing Arts in Rockville, MD on Sunday, March 24 from 1-4.

Here is his obituary from The Washington Post:

Skip Groff, record store owner who presided over a D.C. punk paradise, dies at 70

by Harrison Smith /February 20

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Mark Baily goes through albums at Yesterday & Today, the Rockville, Md., record store that Skip Groff opened in 1978. (Robert A. Reeder/The Washington Post)

Skip Groff, a radio DJ and producer whose strip-mall record shop, Yesterday & Today, became a vinyl-filled sanctuary, incubator, gathering place and meeting hall for Washington’s punk and alternative music scenes, died Feb. 18 at a hospital in Olney, Md. He was 70.

He had suffered a seizure earlier that day, said his wife, Kelly Groff.

From 1977 until it closed in 2002, “Y&T,” as it was known, was a Washington music mecca. Located in suburban Rockville, Md., the store accumulated more than 1 million 45s, by Mr. Groff’s count, as well as thousands of new and used LPs, CDs, cassettes and music magazines.

“That store was like a clubhouse,” said concert promoter Seth Hurwitz, whose company I.M.P. once sold tickets to 9:30 Club shows out of Yesterday & Today. “It was a gathering place, kind of like a soda shop or a garage in the ’50s. You go in there, and you’d usually see someone you knew.”

Holding court from behind the counter, Mr. Groff steered listeners toward records by the Sex Pistols, Velvet Underground or British singer Kirsty MacColl, for whom he named his daughter. His store was named for a 1966 release by the Beatles, which originally featured a “butcher” cover showing the Fab Four with raw meat and decapitated baby dolls.

Among Washington-area record stores, Mr. Groff’s shop “had the most extensive selection of imported punk records and new wave and post punk,” said Howard Wuelfing, a publicist and musician hired as Mr. Groff’s first employee.

Mr. Groff in 1997, cuing up a record at his store in Rockville. (Robert A. Reeder:The Washington Post).jpg

Mr. Groff in 1997, cuing up a record at his store in Rockville. (Robert A. Reeder/The Washington Post)

The store, he added, drew shoppers including Misfits singer Glenn Danzig and Dead Kennedys singer Jello Biafra, who made the trek north up Rockville Pike while on tour in Washington, as well as budding musicians such as Henry Rollins and Ian MacKaye.

“Sometimes you go into a record store, and the person behind the counter makes you feel like you have trespassed,” said MacKaye, who co-founded Dischord Records and led bands including Minor Threat and Fugazi. “And sometimes the owner, or the person behind the counter, makes you feel like he was wondering what took you so long. I put Skip in the latter.”

Mr. Groff maintained a wide selection of country and western rarities, rock and new-wave classics, obscure metal singles from Britain and Canada, and a smattering of Top 40 hits. He had initially planned to specialize in late-’60s rock and psychedelia, but his focus shifted with the rise of punk rock in England, which Mr. Groff visited several times each year to buy records.

“When you start selling 15 to 20 Buzzcocks or X-Ray Spex records and one Beatles record, your ideas get changed around pretty quickly,” he said, according to the D.C. punk history “Dance of Days” by Mark Andersen and Mark Jenkins.

He soon evolved from a punk-music salesman into a producer and patron, hiring up-and-coming musicians at his store and recording many of them on his label, Limp Records. By the early 1980s, he had produced most of Washington’s leading punk groups, including State of Alert, the Slickee Boys, the Razz, Velvet Monkeys, Youth Brigade, the Nurses, Black Market Baby and Minor Threat.

Mr. Groff had never intended to be a producer — “It was just something that was asked of him, and he was happy to help,” his wife said — and largely stopped recording bands after the launch of Dischord Records in 1980. The label was inspired and supported early on by Mr. Groff, who produced its first record, “Minor Disturbance” (1980), an eight-song EP released by MacKaye and Jeff Nelson’s band the Teen Idles.

“To say that Dischord Records wouldn’t exist had it not been for Skip Groff isn’t really a stretch,” the musicians and Dischord co-founders wrote in an online statement. “The very fact that he had his own label,” they added, “was a huge inspiration to a bunch of D.C. kids who had no idea how the music industry worked or that the ability to create records would be within our reach.”

Frank Samuel Groff III was born in Waltham, Mass., on Nov. 20, 1948. His father served in the Air Force, and his mother later worked for the Transportation Department; the nickname Skip emerged out of a pet name she gave him, Skippers.

The family moved frequently, living in Japan before settling in Suitland, Md., where Mr. Groff graduated from high school. He studied television and radio at the University of Maryland, where he worked as music director of the student radio station, WMUC, but did not receive a degree.

Mr. Groff had been “a record fanatic” ever since he saw the Beatles perform on “The Ed Sullivan” show as a teenager, his wife said, and after serving in the Army, he worked at radio stations including WINX in Rockville. He was a promoter for RCA in St. Louis in the early 1970s and produced records for the heavy metal band Pentagram before opening the Kensington, Md., record store Hit and Run with a partner, Al Ercolani.

“He was more interested in albums,” Mr. Groff once told Washington City Paper. “I was more interested in 45s. So after a couple months working together I just decided it would be better if we had our own separate shops, with our own separate agendas.”

Mr. Groff opened Yesterday & Today in a strip mall dubbed Sunshine Square, paying $450 a month in rent, and worked occasionally as a DJ at stations including WAVA and WPGC. After closing the store amid rising rent, he and his wife — a former customer — continued to sell vinyl through Internet and mail orders and at local record shows.

In addition to his wife of 31 years, the former Kelly Cuthbert, of Olney, survivors include a daughter, Kirsty Groff of Bethesda, Md.; a brother; and two sisters.

Even when he was closing his brick-and-mortar shop, Mr. Groff was eyeing new records. In an interview, MacKaye recalled that he and Rollins happened to be in town just as Mr. Groff was scheduled to move out and went up to say goodbye, expecting to find the place cleared out.

“We get there, and almost nothing had been done,” he said. “Skip was frantically throwing records into boxes.” What had happened?

Mr. Groff explained that he “had other things going on.” He had, it turned out, just acquired a private collection of 40,000 records.